Tag Archives: France

Celebrating 300 Posts!

Related Posts: Celebrating 100 Posts! and Celebrating 200 Posts!

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I can’t believe I’ve publishing over 300 posts on WordPress! I started WordPressing March 2012 and have had an amazing experience sharing my work and interacting with people all over the world. Thank you so much!!! :)

Want to revisit all 300 some previous posts? Want to see what posts are coming up? Please check out my contents page!

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Please visit my store: thepoetandtheflea.storenvy.com!

For more updates, follow me on facebooktumblr and twitter.

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Copyright 2014 by G. E. Gallas


Cross-Country Adventure Hiatus!

Related Post: Cannes/London Trip Hiatus! and Cannes/London 2013: Compilation.

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Map

This is incredibly out of the blue, but I’m moving back to the East Coast!

Long story short, I’m helping my parents move from San Francisco back to Maryland, so I’m going too. Although it’s a bit bittersweet, I’m happy about this move since D.C. seems a bit more active in film compared to San Francisco. AND I’ll be much closer to NYC, which has a ton of film and filmmakers. Eventually, once I have saved up some money, I’m actually thinking of moving to Brooklyn. But, for the meantime, D.C. it is! :D

With that being said, I’m still 100% committed to filming Death Is No Bad Friend in San Francisco and Northern California. So when we get funded, I’ll just fly back and stay with relatives!!

We will be traveling from Friday, November 1st through Thursday, November 12th, stopping in Kansas City, Missouri for a few days to visit my bubbie. Here’s our schedule…

  1. San Francisco, California
  2. San Jose, California
  3. Laughlin, Nevada
  4. Albuquerque, New Mexico
  5. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  6. Kansas City, Missouri
  7. Effingham, Illinois
  8. Reynoldsburg, Ohio
  9. Washington, D.C./Gaithersburg, Maryland

I’m guessing I’ll have pretty sporadic internet connection along the way, so I probably won’t have time to post anything here. But I might have a tweet or two. I’ll try to take some photos along the way and share them will all of you!

See you mid-November,

G. E.

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Please visit my store: thepoetandtheflea.storenvy.com!

For more updates, follow me on facebooktumblr and twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Coming Soon: Death Is No Bad Friend Indiegogo Campaign

★★★ PLEASE REBLOG & SPREAD THE WORD!!! ★★★

WE, SIREN’S GAZE PRODUCTIONS, ARE HOPING TO RAISE FUNDS FOR OUR SHORT FILM DEATH IS NO BAD FRIEND ABOUT ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON (TREASURE ISLAND, STRANGE CASE OF DR JEKYLL AND MR HYDE) IN SAN FRANCISCO.

THE SCREENPLAY HAS RECEIVED AMPLE PRAISE AND THERE IS A WONDERFUL CAST & CREW ATTACHED TO THIS PROJECT ALREADY. 

WE ARE PLANNING ON LAUNCHING OUR INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN WITHIN THE COMING WEEKS.

PLEASE HELP SPREAD THE WORD ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, TUMBLR, PINTEREST, ETC.!

SIREN’S GAZE PRODUCTIONS on WordPress:

sirensgazeproductions.wordpress.com

SIREN’S GAZE PRODUCTIONS on Facebook:

facebook.com/sirensgazeproductions

DEATH IS NO BAD FRIEND on Facebook:

facebook.com/pages/Death-Is-No-Bad-Friend/164927033704154

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Kyle Duke Adamiec as Robert Louis Stevenson in our upcoming Indiegogo trailer for Death Is No Bad Friend.
Photograph by G. E. Gallas

Siren’s Gaze Productions (sirensgazeproductions.wordpress.com) was born at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival as a collaboration between three young, unique, and ambitious female filmmakers — director Mary Lachapelle, cinematographer Jacqueline Lehr, and screenwriter/producer G. E. Gallas. Each of us has an undying passion for our expertise. Yet our individual personalities fit together to form an intuitive and vibrant production team.

 
Death Is No Bad Friend is a short film based on the life and works of Robert Louis Stevenson (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr HydeTreasure Island). Robert Louis attempts to escape his guilty conscience through honeymooning on Mount Saint Helena. But his illness catches up, forcing him to face his demons.

 
This film is Siren’s Gaze Productions’ first project. We believe that Robert Louis and Fanny Stevenson’s story is historically and culturally significant, and therefore should be celebrated through the medium of cinema. Our greatest goal is to create an outstanding film to submit to festivals around the world (Cannes, Toronto, Sundance, etc.) and to launch the careers of all cast and crew involved.

 
We are all 100% committed to this project. We are prepared to make this film on a shoestring budget, donating our time and skills. But every penny counts! We are hoping to raise between $10,000 and $25,000 to allow us to bring Death Is No Bad Friend to life.

 
We need YOU to support our production expenses and to spread the word. Through funding and promoting Death Is No Bad Friend, you will help us bring the unfamiliar and extraordinary life of the famous writer Robert Louis Stevenson into the public eye. Moreover, you will be helping a group of young creatives take their first big step in achieving their lifelong dreams of becoming professional filmmakers!

 

Screenplay:

  • 2nd round qualifier in the Kaos Films British Short Screenplay Competition 2012, judged by Sir Kenneth Branagh.
  •  Quater finalist in the 2013 CWA (Creative World Awards).
  • Death Is No Bad Friend is a poetic script that relies on imagery to evoke a morose feeling. The language is very well-crafted, with the characters’ style of speech accurate for the time period. Because the descriptions are succinct but also written in a similar style, the script reads easily and quickly while creating clear images of the locations.” –Feedback from the 2014 BlueCat Screenplay Competition.
  • Genre: Drama, Historical, Biographical.

Cast & Crew:

Goals:

Your contributions will help us achieve the following goals…

  • To successfully develop Death Is No Bad Friend through pre-production, filming, and post-production.
  • To celebrate the historical and cultural significance of Robert Louis and Fanny Stevenson.
  • To create a high production value, historically accurate, collaborative film.
  • To film in and around the San Francisco Bay Area/Northern California.
  • To submit the finished film to a number of festivals including the Cannes Film Festival, Sundance Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival.
  • To create an opportunity to expand Death Is No Bad Friend into a full-length script/feature film to further celebrate the historical and cultural significance of Robert Louis and Fanny Stevenson.
  • To create further opportunities for Siren’s Gaze Productions to create films and further the careers of all cast and crew involved.

WE TRULY APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT!

KEEP YOUR PEEPERS ON THIS PAGE FOR THE LAUNCH OF OUR INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN!

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Please visit my store: thepoetandtheflea.storenvy.com!

For more updates, follow me on facebooktumblr and twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Celebrating 200 Posts!

Related Post: Celebrating 100 Posts!

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200

It’s difficult to believe, but I’ve published just over 200 posts on WordPress! I started WordPressing March 2012 and have had a wonderful time sharing my thoughts and work with the world. The best part of this experience has been interacting with all the amazingly creative, talented, interesting, warmhearted, and generous individuals who have connected with me through their comments. Thank you so much!!! :)

In the coming weeks, I will be working hard on raising funds through Indiegogo for my short film Death Is No Bad Friend. I am absolutely thrilled to be working with such amazing filmmakers (Siren’s Gaze Productions) on this project. And I hope that everyone here will help support us!

Best regards,

G. E.

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Please visit my store: thepoetandtheflea.storenvy.com!

For more updates, follow me on facebooktumblr and twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Attack on Titan: Analogy to World War II

Okay, I just had to get this off my chest…

The Japanese manga and anime series Attack on Titan made absolutely zero sense to me until I realized it is an unmistakable analogy to World War II.

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All over the internet, I kept seeing disturbing images of a giant human with no skin. I’m not particularly squeamish about violence in the media — most horror movies drive me into a fit of hysterical laughter. Plus, I’m generally fascinated by the macabre.  But certain things just get to me. Like the part in the brilliant Pan’s Labyrinth when Captain Vidal’s face is mutilated and he sews it back together (though I adore the Pale Man). Or in Boardwalk Empire (one of my favorite shows) when Richard Harrow (one of my favorite characters) scalps another character without hesitation.  And this giant skinless human is no different — sending shivers down my spine!

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Image from Attack on Titan
Disclaimer: I do not own this image!!

I soon discovered that this giant skinless human is from a series called Attack on Titan (進撃の巨人, Shingeki no Kyoujin). When I first became interested in Japan around middle school, I used to watch a lot of anime. But I tend towards live-action series or movies nowadays (a wonderful tool for practicing my language skills). I do find the occasional anime series like the amazing Gankutsuou (巌窟王): The Count of Monte Cristo (which is actually the most faithful adaptation of Dumas’s masterwork) and the gripping Monster (モンスター) (scheduled to be adapted into live-action for HBO by Guillermo del Toro). In other words, I’m usually extremely picky about my anime. But, after being utterly confused by the Attack on Titan Wikipedia summary, I decided to give the series a try out of pure morbid curiosity.

So, I’ve been working my way through the episodes on Hulu. It might be a bit melodramatic at times and the so-called “Vertical Maneuvering Equipment” that allows the characters to leap around is pretty implausible. But it has a relatively well-constructed plot line and decent character development. The main characters Eren and Mikasa have particularly tragic yet compelling backstories. But I couldn’t help a strange feeling of déjà vu

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A page from Barefoot Gen by Keiji Nakazawa
Disclaimer: I do not own this image!!

And then it hit me! I realized that certain elements of Attack on Titan bear a striking resemblance to the renowned manga Barefoot Gen (はだしのゲン, Hadashi no Gen), about the bombing of Hiroshima and its survivors.

For instance: In Attack on Titan, Eren and Mikasa attempt to free Eren’s mother from underneath their collapsed house. But Eren’s mother begs them to save themselves. Eren and Mikasa, with the help of a city guard names Hannes, flee from danger as Eren’s mother is killed and eaten by a titan. This directly parallels Barefoot Gen. After the atom bomb drops on Hiroshima, Gen and his mother Kimie discover Gen’s father Daikichi and Gen’s siblings trapped underneath their collapsed house. Gen and Kimie attempt to free the rest of the family before they are consumed by the fire that has broken out all across the city. But Daikichi begs them to save themselves. Gen and Kimie are forced to flee from danger.

This parallel leads me to believe that the humanoid titans may have been inspired by the victims of the atom bombs. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki, many victim’s skin melted off or hung from their bodies in tatters. These victims must have been in excruciating pain and are depicted moving very slowly and blindly, almost like zombies. Although the titans are not meant to be sympathized with (at least not yet) as one would sympathize with the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, their movements are very similar. In this context, the one skinless titan makes so much more sense to me. I really won’t be surprised if the series reveals that the titans are resulted from a human scientific experiment gone wrong and that we are indeed meant to sympathize with them.

Attack on Titan‘s analogy to World War II does not stop with the atom bombs. The series often explores themes related to militarism, group mentality, and self-sacrfice — topics often associated with Japan during World War II as well as World War II across the board.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Perhaps I’ll post more correlations between Attack on Titan and Barefoot Gen as I continue watching!

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Please visit my store: thepoetandtheflea.storenvy.com!

For more updates, follow me on facebooktumblr and twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Cannes/London 2013: Compilation

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Cannes

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Here is a compilation of all the posts regarding my Cannes/London 2013 trip. Please enjoy!

  1. Pre-Travel Planning
  2. Bon Voyage, See You in June!
  3. Saturday May 11th
  4. Sunday, May 12th
  5. Monday, May 13th
  6. Tuesday, May 14th
  7. Wednesday, May 15th
  8. Thursday, May 16th
  9. Friday, May 17th
  10. Saturday, May 18th
  11. Sunday, May 19th
  12. Monday, May 20th
  13. Tuesday, May 21st
  14. Wednesday, May 22nd
  15. Thursday, May 23rd
  16. Friday, May 24th
  17. Saturday, May 25th
  18. Sunday, May 26th
  19. Monday, May 27th
  20. Tuesday, May 28th
  21. Tuesday, May 28th @ Tate Britain
  22. Tuesday, May 28th @ Tate Britain, William Blake Rooms
  23. Wednesday, May 29th
  24. Wednesday, May 29th @ National Portrait Gallery
  25. Thursday, May 30th

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Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Cannes/London 2013: Thursday, May 30th

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Eros in Piccadilly Circus.

Today — Elena, Laura and I explored the William Blake historic sites. We met at Piccadilly Circus and walked over to Saint James’s Church, where Blake was baptized. The baptismal font is still there, with very intricate carvings of Adam and Eve. It’s amazing to think that Blake was once a baby who could fit in that font!

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St. James’s Church.

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A Blake quote welcoming visitors of St. James’s.

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Another side of St. James’s.

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The baptismal font.

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Closeup of the baptismal font.

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Inside St. James’s.

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A different angle inside St. James’s.

Then, we took a double-decker bus through the city all the way across the Thames to Battersea to visit Saint Mary’s Church were Blake and Catherine were married. We almost got lost since there were a number of similar churchs in the area, but we managed to find the right one. The ladies in the church were a bit confused at first by our presence. But when I told them that we are Blake enthusiasts, they immediately understood.

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Inside the double-decker bus!

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St. Mary’s Church Battersea

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View across the Thames.

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Inside St. Mary’s.

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Inside St. Mary’s: stained-glass window commemorating Blake.

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Detail of stained glass.

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Another detail of stained glass.

After that, we went to visit Blake’s grave at Bunhill Fields. It was a very old but charming cemetary, and it was fascinating watching them in the process of restoring some of the old crypts and tombstones. I left a simple offering at Blake’s gravestone — an apple — and also explored the green where Blake’s physical body is supposed to have been buried (I believe The Friends of William Blake are trying to raise money and/or petition for a special monument at Blake’s actual burial site).

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Bunhill Fields is quite serene.

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A memorial obelisk to Daniel Defoe.

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Blake and Catherine’s grave marker.

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A simple offering.

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Blake’s actual remains are somewhere around here, I think.

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Didn’t get a chance to go in… Next time!

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John Bunyan‘s tomb.

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Another angle of Bunyan’s tomb.

Then, we went to visit Westminster Abbey. Here, I unfortunately got separated from Elena and Laura, and we couldn’t find each other again. :( But I’m glad I went, even though it was a bit overwhelming to take in. I especially enjoyed the Poets’ Corner where I saw commemorations to Lord Byron, Lewis Carroll and Blake among others.

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Big Ben/Elizabeth Tower.

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Approaching Westminster Abbey.

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Westminster Abbey!

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I spy the London Eye!

The absolute highlight of my day — and possibly even my trip — was the British Museum’s Department of Prints and Drawings. I didn’t get to see all that much of the museum proper, but inside this department I was allowed to handle and examine an original print of Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience. When I say “prints,” I mean a copy made by Blake himself on his own printing press!! I was able to see many of my favorite poems — “The Tyger,” “The Fly,” “The Sick Rose,” etc. The prints are indescribably complex and beautiful, and surprisingly tiny. It was amazing rereading these poems as they were originally meant to be read! After that, I enjoyed afternoon tea at the museum for a surprisingly reasonable price. And I ate every last sandwich, cake, and scone. :D

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Inside The British Museum.

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Afternoon tea is about to commence.

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Now I feel that my trip is complete.

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I ate every last crumb!

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Scones and clotted cream.

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That was fun!

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See ya’ later, British Museum!

Tomorrow, back to San Francisco!

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Above is the last entry of the journal I wrote during my Cannes/London trip.

Overall, this trip was an amazing experience and I’m glad I was able to do almost everything I planned to.

I met so many amazing people along the way and was inspired by everything I encountered.

I hope you all enjoyed reading these posts!

Best,

G. E.

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For more updates, don’t forget to follow me on facebooktumblr and/or twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Cannes/London 2013: Wednesday, May 29th @ National Portrait Gallery

Related Post: Cannes/London 2013: Wednesday, May 29th.

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Here are some of my favorite pieces I saw at the National Portrait Gallery in London during my visit!

Disclaimer: I do not own any of these images!!

(Click on images to enlarge.)

1. Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn

2. Queen Elizabeth

Queen Elizabeth

3. Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton

Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton

Anne of Denmark by John de Critz the Elder

5. William Shakespeare by John Taylor

William Shakespeare by John Taylor

6. Queen Henrietta Maria

Queen Henrietta Maria

7. King George IV, when Prince Regent by Sir Thomas Lawrence

King George IV, when Prince Regent by Sir Thomas Lawrence

8. William Blake by Thomas Phillips

William Blake by Thomas Phillips

9. Lord Byron by Thomas Phillips

Lord Byron by Thomas Phillips

NPG 938; Sir Richard Owen by Henry William Pickersgill

Sir Richard Owen by Henry William Pickersgill

11. Lady Colin Campbell by Giovanni Boldini

Lady Colin Campbell by Giovanni Boldini

12. William Holman Hunt by Sir William Blake Richmond

William Holman Hunt by Sir William Blake Richmond

(c) DACS; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Aubrey Beardsley by Jacques-Emile Blanche

NPG 1028; Robert Louis Stevenson by Sir William Blake Richmond

Robert Louis Stevenson by Sir William Blake Richmond

15. Louise Jopling by Sir John Everett Millais

Louise Jopling by Sir John Everett Millais

NPG 1325; Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan by Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Bt

Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan by Sir John Everett Millais

NPG 1078; William Morris by George Frederic Watts

William Morris by George Frederic Watts

NPG 1172; Charles Dickens by Daniel Maclise

Charles Dickens by Daniel Maclise

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***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


Cannes/London 2013: Wednesday, May 29th

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Underground.

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Approaching Trafalgar Square.

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Trafalgar Square.

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View from Trafalgar Square.

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Elmgreen and Dragset’s bronze sculpture of a boy on a rocking horse.

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Statue of George IV.

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Statue of Shakespeare under renovation at Leicester Square.

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A favorite quote.

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I couldn’t resist The Cumberbatch.

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Along Leicester Square.

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Entrance to the National Portrait Gallery.

I began my day exploring Trafalgar Square and the surrounding area while waiting for the museums to open. I went from statue to statue, taking photos and reading inscriptions. Around the block, I found myself at Leicester Square where a statue of Shakespeare is under renovation.

I spent about an hour or so running around the National Portrait Gallery, which was a lot of fun since very few people were there so it felt as if I had the whole museum to myself. During this time, I discovered many interesting paintings and that sometimes the portrait is just as much about the subject as it is about the artist behind the scenes. I was particularly delighted that the portraits of William Blake, Lord Byron, and Lord & Mary Shelley were all in the same room. Also, I was excited to see Sir William Blake Richmond’s portrait of Robert Louis Stevenson and Sir John Everett Millais’s portrait of Sir Arthur Sullivan.

Relate Post: Cannes/London 2013: Wednesday, May 29th @ National Portrait Gallery.

After that, I had an early lunch at The Chandos pub Opera Room — a cozy restaurant with fire places and stained glass windows — and ate the most incredible fish and chips I’ve ever had. Like the Portrait Gallery, I had this place too all to myself.

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The Chandos pub.

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Entrance to the Opera Room.

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Inside the Opera Room.

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Stained glass windows in the Opera Room.

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Nothing like a fireplace on a rainy day.

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Teatime!!

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Fish and Chips to die for!

After lunch, I tried to take the Harrods bus tour, but it was sold out — which was fine by me. Instead, I bought some chocolates and candies at Harrods for later and had tea time at Café Liberty, inside the Liberty of London department store.

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Harrods is quite over the top.

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Difficult to resist all the candy and chocolates.

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The famous Egyptian room.

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Liberty of London.

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Inside Liberty.

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Can’t get enough of this architecture.

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Can I film a movie in here?

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Inside Café Liberty.

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Teatime, again!!

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Aromatic Darjeeling.

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I have a weakness for lemon tart.

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See you later, Liberty.

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Green tea chocolate, marzipan, and Turkish delight from Harrods.

Around 7 p.m., I was reunited after three years with my great friend Elena and company for a Jack the Ripper walking tour. It was so wonderful to see Elena again and we all had a great time on the tour. The tour guide was very good, like an actor performing each character in every murder and theory. At the end, to rest our feet a bit before going home, we hung out at The Ten Bells pub — know as the Jack the Ripper Pub since the victim “…Annie Chapman may have drunk at the pub shortly before she was murdered.”

All in all, a busy but exciting day!

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An old city wall.

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A church where one of the Ripper’s victims was seen.

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The Gherkin.

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Along the Ripper’s path.

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Tracking the Ripper’s footsteps.

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My camera is making everything blurry.

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Very ominous.

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Not far from where the Ripper’s last victim was murdered.

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Christ Church, Spitalfields.

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Outside the Ten Bells pub.

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Our tour guide!

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Inside the Ten Bells.

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Another foreboding photo of the Ten Bells.

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Spitalfields Market at night.

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For more updates, don’t forget to follow me on facebooktumblr and/or twitter.

***

Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


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