Category Archives: Research

Yale December 2014: Yale Center for British Art and Yale University Art Gallery

Related Post: Yale December 2014.


This is just a list of what art I saw at Yale this December for my personal record.

Disclaimer: I do not own any of the following images!


America a Prophecy: Frontispiece and pages 3-7, 9, 11, 12, and 15.
I was surprised to realize that this work was printed in blue ink and that the pages are much larger than Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Here are some of my favorite pages…
America a Prophecy 1
America a Prophecy 6
America a Prophecy 9
America a Prophecy 11
Jerusalem: Frontispiece and pages 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 60, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, and 74.
Similar to America a Prophecy‘s blue ink, this work was printed in orange ink. Here are some of my favorite pages…
Jerusalem 1
Jerusalem 2
Jerusalem 8
Jerusalem 25
Jerusalem 26
Jerusalem 41
Jerusalem 47
Jerusalem 63
Jerusalem 70
The Death of Chatterton by Pre-Raphaelite painter Henry Wallis
The Death of Chatterton

Yes or No? by  Pre-Raphaelite painter Sir John Everett Millais


An Allegory of Intemperance by Early Netherlandish painter Hieronymus Bosch

Colored Folks Corner


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Copyright 2015 by G. E. Gallas

A Raven Above Press’s “Welsh in the Old West” Project

Related Post: A Raven Above Press’s Welsh Saints Project and Work in Progress: Saint Tewdrig.


As you may recall, last year, I created an illustration of Saint Tewdrig for A Raven Above Press‘s collaborative title Age of Saints: An Illustrated Guide to the Saints of Wales by Peter Anthony Freeman. This year, I was once again invited by A Raven Above Press to contribute to their collaborative book Welsh in the Old West by Lorin Morgan-Richards.


Portrait of Elias Morris (Disclaimer: I do not own this image!)

This time, I will be illustrating a fellow named Elias Morris. Here is the description for the project’s Facebook event:

Elias Morris was a young stone mason in Wales, after serving his apprenticeship under the guidance of his father, hired himself out to the contractor of the Conway Castle and the Conway Bridge. This work completed, he went to Liverpool to gain a wider experience in his trade. Upon returning to Wales a year or so later to visit his folks, he heard the Gospel of Jesus Christ, was converted, and soon started on the long journey to Zion. Reaching Council Bluffs in May, 1852, he met his betrothed, who had preceded him to this country. They were married and immediately started on their trip across the plains. At Independence Rock, Wyoming, the young stone mason had the first urge to ply his trade. He took his chisel from his bag and carved in everlasting letters: ELIAS MORRIS and his wife, MARY P. MORRIS. Hundreds of names are scratched upon that Register of the Desert—some still legible—but the expert carving of his name earned for him the title “first stone cutter of Utah.”
He became a famous tombstone maker which more is written about he and his company.


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Copyright 2014 by G. E. Gallas

NYC Adventure: Day 3 & 4

Related Post: NYC Adventure: Day 1 & 2.



NYC July 2014 17

Outside The Morgan Library & Museum.

NYC July 2014 14

“Some are born to sweet delight, Some are born to endless night” in William Blake’s hand!!!

NYC July 2014 12

Outside the Neue Galerie.

NYC July 2014 11

My alma mater, New York University: Gallatin School of Individualized Study.

NYC July 2014 10

Washington Square Park.

NYC July 2014 09

The Washington Arch.

NYC July 2014 08

Inside the Angelika Film Center.

NYC July 2014 07

Can’t visit New York without eating a black and white cookie!

NYC July 2014 06

The Angelika logo.

NYC July 2014 05

After the movie, Indian food!

NYC July 2014 04



NYC July 2014 03

Queens! On the way to brunch.

NYC July 2014 02


NYC July 2014 01

Ariel becoming caffeinated!


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Copyright 2014 by G. E. Gallas

NYC Adventure: Day 1 & 2

Related Post: NYC Adventure: Day 3 & 4.



NYC July 2014 45

Tasty lunch at a Thai restaurant.

NYC July 2014 44

Just arrived at the Frick Collection.

NYC July 2014 42

The Frick Collection’s Garden Court.

NYC July 2014 41

Cute little fountain!

NYC July 2014 38

The Conservatory Water in Central Park.

NYC July 2014 37

The Loeb Central Park Boathouse.

NYC July 2014 36

The Lake in Central Park.

NYC July 2014 35

The Bethesda Fountain, Central Park.

NYC July 2014 33

The Bethesda Terrace, Central Park.

NYC July 2014 31

A snack at Kinokuniya!

NYC July 2014 30

Yoga in Bryant Park.

NYC July 2014 27

Souvenir Whistler postcards from the Frick Collection and Watashi no Otoko from Kinokuniya.


NYC July 2014 25

Just outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

NYC July 2014 23

Inside the Met.

NYC July 2014 22

The Flatiron Building.

NYC July 2014 21

Madison Square Park.

NYC July 2014 20

The Empire State Building.

NYC July 2014 19

The Alamo on Astor Place.

NYC July 2014 18

A Pre-Raphaelite brochure from the Met and two Noah Van Sciver zines from Forbidden Planet.


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Copyright 2014 by G. E. Gallas

Attack on Titan: Analogy to World War II

Okay, I just had to get this off my chest…

The Japanese manga and anime series Attack on Titan made absolutely zero sense to me until I realized it is an unmistakable analogy to World War II.


All over the internet, I kept seeing disturbing images of a giant human with no skin. I’m not particularly squeamish about violence in the media — most horror movies drive me into a fit of hysterical laughter. Plus, I’m generally fascinated by the macabre.  But certain things just get to me. Like the part in the brilliant Pan’s Labyrinth when Captain Vidal’s face is mutilated and he sews it back together (though I adore the Pale Man). Or in Boardwalk Empire (one of my favorite shows) when Richard Harrow (one of my favorite characters) scalps another character without hesitation.  And this giant skinless human is no different — sending shivers down my spine!

Screen shot 2013-09-27 at 1.13.46 AM

Image from Attack on Titan
Disclaimer: I do not own this image!!

I soon discovered that this giant skinless human is from a series called Attack on Titan (進撃の巨人, Shingeki no Kyoujin). When I first became interested in Japan around middle school, I used to watch a lot of anime. But I tend towards live-action series or movies nowadays (a wonderful tool for practicing my language skills). I do find the occasional anime series like the amazing Gankutsuou (巌窟王): The Count of Monte Cristo (which is actually the most faithful adaptation of Dumas’s masterwork) and the gripping Monster (モンスター) (scheduled to be adapted into live-action for HBO by Guillermo del Toro). In other words, I’m usually extremely picky about my anime. But, after being utterly confused by the Attack on Titan Wikipedia summary, I decided to give the series a try out of pure morbid curiosity.

So, I’ve been working my way through the episodes on Hulu. It might be a bit melodramatic at times and the so-called “Vertical Maneuvering Equipment” that allows the characters to leap around is pretty implausible. But it has a relatively well-constructed plot line and decent character development. The main characters Eren and Mikasa have particularly tragic yet compelling backstories. But I couldn’t help a strange feeling of déjà vu


A page from Barefoot Gen by Keiji Nakazawa
Disclaimer: I do not own this image!!

And then it hit me! I realized that certain elements of Attack on Titan bear a striking resemblance to the renowned manga Barefoot Gen (はだしのゲン, Hadashi no Gen), about the bombing of Hiroshima and its survivors.

For instance: In Attack on Titan, Eren and Mikasa attempt to free Eren’s mother from underneath their collapsed house. But Eren’s mother begs them to save themselves. Eren and Mikasa, with the help of a city guard names Hannes, flee from danger as Eren’s mother is killed and eaten by a titan. This directly parallels Barefoot Gen. After the atom bomb drops on Hiroshima, Gen and his mother Kimie discover Gen’s father Daikichi and Gen’s siblings trapped underneath their collapsed house. Gen and Kimie attempt to free the rest of the family before they are consumed by the fire that has broken out all across the city. But Daikichi begs them to save themselves. Gen and Kimie are forced to flee from danger.

This parallel leads me to believe that the humanoid titans may have been inspired by the victims of the atom bombs. In Hiroshima and Nagasaki, many victim’s skin melted off or hung from their bodies in tatters. These victims must have been in excruciating pain and are depicted moving very slowly and blindly, almost like zombies. Although the titans are not meant to be sympathized with (at least not yet) as one would sympathize with the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, their movements are very similar. In this context, the one skinless titan makes so much more sense to me. I really won’t be surprised if the series reveals that the titans are resulted from a human scientific experiment gone wrong and that we are indeed meant to sympathize with them.

Attack on Titan‘s analogy to World War II does not stop with the atom bombs. The series often explores themes related to militarism, group mentality, and self-sacrfice — topics often associated with Japan during World War II as well as World War II across the board.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Perhaps I’ll post more correlations between Attack on Titan and Barefoot Gen as I continue watching!


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Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas

Death Is No Bad Friend: Research

Related Posts: Death Is No Bad Friend: Development and Crowdfunding.


Yesterday, I had a wonderful meeting with the actor I hope to play Robert Louis Stevenson in my short screenplay Death Is No Bad Friend.

I’ve been very busy recruiting cast and crew for this project as well as drafting the Indiegogo campaign (launching this October) to the best of my ability.

At this point, I feel like a jack-of-all-trades screenwriter/producer/casting director/costume designer/location scout/etcetera!!!

I’m just so incredibly determined to see this project through. :D

Today, I thought I’d share some research images to give you a taste of what Death Is No Bad Friend will be like.

I find these paintings and photographs of Robert Louis and Fanny to be extremely intriguing and I hope we can capture the essence of these historical figures on film.

All images are from Wikimedia Commons:

1 Robert Louis Stevenson by Sargent

Portrait of Robert Louis Stevenson by John Singer Sargent (1887)

2 Fanny Osbourne

Fanny (Osbourne) Stevenson (1920)

3 Kalakaua and Robert Louis Stevenson in 1889

Kalakaua and Robert Louis Stevenson (1889)

4. RLS


5. RLS

Robert Louis Stevenson (before 1894)

6. RLS

Robert Louis Stevenson (1870)

7. King Kalakaua with the Stevenson family

Kalakaua with the Stevenson Family (1889)


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Copyright 2013 by G. E. Gallas


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